You are currently browsing the category archive for the ‘Somali Diaspora’ category.

The image “https://i0.wp.com/www.startribune.com/media/2005/12/16/flag.source.gif” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

Eden Prairie School District’s adult class in Somali language and culture is seen by non-Somalis as way to foster communication.

Abdullahi Hassan said when he heard more than 28 adults had registered for the Somali language and culture class he teaches in Eden Prairie, he couldn’t believe it.

Advertisements

 

SomaliTalk.com

 

Xaflad muhiim ah oo lagu qabtaya magalada qahira oo ay soo qaban qaabiyen naadiga aradayda somaliyed iyo jaaliyadda qaahira Read the rest of this entry »

https://i0.wp.com/www.masslive.com/images/article/republican_mast.jpg

By ANNE-GERARD FLYNN

aflynn@repub.com

“It is an open invitation from the Somali community to learn more about Somali culture, the Somali Women’s Project and the collective that is emerging from it and to support the community and enjoy live music, food and performances,” said Andrea M. Assaf of the Walaalo! Somali Community Festival. Read the rest of this entry »

102107 Interpreter By CHINKI SINHA | Observer-Dispatch

UTICA (NY)– MAMI ko talash hai nayi bhashaon ke jaankaron ki. 

If you can understand the statement above, which is written in Hindi/Urdu, then you know you’re needed at MAMI, a local agency that provides interpreter services.  Read the rest of this entry »

ABERDEEN, S.D. (AP) – Supply and demand are out of whack when it comes to goat meat, according to Curtis Haaland, of rural Aberdeen.“Production is not anywhere near what demand is,” said Haaland, who, along with his wife Carmen Haaland, is trying to help satisfy the growing demand by raising the animals.

One reason is that Hispanic, Somali and other cultural groups, particularly Muslim populations, are growing in the United States – and they favor goat meat. Read the rest of this entry »

The world seems to have forgotten that international humanitarian law applies to everyone – even suspected terrorists.

by Rosa Davis
Saturday, August 04, 2007

Bashir Ahmed Makhtal’s family fled to Canada (via Somalia) in the 1970s in order to avoid the continuing persecution of ethnic Somalis in Ethiopia. He lived and studied in Canada, working for the Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce, before moving back to the Horn of Africa in 2001 to open a clothing business. Read the rest of this entry »